Document
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q
 
þ
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2017
or
 
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from ___ to ___                    
Commission File Number: 001-37905
 
 
https://cdn.kscope.io/766f354bac783ec56aead3d0487260f2-bhflogo2.jpg
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
 
81-3846992

(State of incorporation)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
 
11225 North Community House Road, Charlotte, North Carolina
 
28277
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
(980) 365-7100
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes ¨     No þ  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes þ    No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and emerging growth company in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer  ¨
  
Accelerated filer  ¨
Non-accelerated filer    þ  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  
Smaller reporting company  ¨
Emerging growth company  ¨
 
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes ¨    No þ
At August 13, 2017, 119,773,106 shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.01 par value per share, were outstanding.
 
 



Table of Contents
 
Page
 
   Item 1.
Combined Financial Statements (at June 30 2017 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2016 and for the Three Months and Six Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 (Unaudited)):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Item 2.
  Item 3.
  Item 4.
 
 
 
  Item 1.
  Item 1A.
  Item 2.
  Item 4.
  Item 5.
  Item 6.
 
 
 
 






Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Interim Condensed Combined Balance Sheets
June 30, 2017 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2016
(In millions, except share and per share data)
 
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Assets
 
 
 
 
Investments:
 
 
 
 
Fixed maturity securities available-for-sale, at estimated fair value (amortized cost: $59,277 and $58,715, respectively; includes $0 and $3,413, respectively, relating to variable interest entities)
 
$
63,507

 
$
61,388

Equity securities available-for-sale, at estimated fair value (cost: $247 and $280, respectively)
 
278

 
300

Mortgage loans (net of valuation allowances of $44 and $40, respectively; includes $123 and $136, respectively, at estimated fair value, relating to variable interest entities)
 
10,263

 
9,378

Policy loans
 
1,513

 
1,517

Real estate and real estate joint ventures
 
302

 
215

Other limited partnership interests
 
1,623

 
1,642

Short-term investments, principally at estimated fair value
 
1,286

 
1,288

Other invested assets, principally at estimated fair value
 
3,037

 
4,904

Total investments
 
81,809

 
80,632

Cash and cash equivalents, principally at estimated fair value (includes $0 and $9, respectively, relating to variable interest entities)
 
4,443

 
5,228

Accrued investment income (includes $1 and $1, respectively, relating to variable interest entities)
 
608

 
693

Premiums, reinsurance and other receivables
 
13,415

 
14,647

Deferred policy acquisition costs and value of business acquired
 
6,464

 
6,293

Current income tax recoverable
 
1,423

 
778

Other assets
 
600

 
616

Separate account assets
 
115,566

 
113,043

Total assets
 
$
224,328

 
$
221,930

Liabilities, Shareholder’s Net Investment and Noncontrolling Interests
 
 
 
 
Liabilities
 
 
 
 
Future policy benefits
 
$
34,352

 
$
33,372

Policyholder account balances
 
37,296

 
37,526

Other policy-related balances
 
2,985

 
3,045

Payables for collateral under securities loaned and other transactions
 
7,121

 
7,390

Long-term debt (includes $16 and $23, respectively, at estimated fair value, relating to variable interest entities)
 
3,016

 
1,910

Collateral financing arrangement
 

 
2,797

Deferred income tax liability
 
2,337

 
2,056

Other liabilities (includes $0 and $1, respectively, relating to variable interest entities)
 
5,190

 
5,929

Separate account liabilities
 
115,566

 
113,043

Total liabilities
 
207,863

 
207,068

Contingencies, Commitments and Guarantees (Note 11)
 

 

Shareholder’s Net Investment and Noncontrolling Interests
 
 
 
 
Shareholder’s net investment
 
14,521

 
13,597

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
 
1,894

 
1,265

Total Shareholder’s net investment
 
16,415

 
14,862

Noncontrolling interests
 
50

 

Total shareholder’s net investment and noncontrolling interests
 
16,465

 
14,862

Total liabilities, shareholder’s net investment and noncontrolling interests
 
$
224,328

 
$
221,930

See accompanying notes to the interim condensed combined financial statements.


2



Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Interim Condensed Combined Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss)
For the Three Months and Six Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 (Unaudited)
(In millions, except share and per share data)
 
Three Months 
 Ended 
 June 30,
 
Six Months 
 Ended 
 June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Premiums
$
218

 
$
281

 
$
394

 
$
674

Universal life and investment-type product policy fees
957

 
936

 
1,910

 
1,867

Net investment income
766

 
805

 
1,548

 
1,553

Other revenues
162

 
347

 
236

 
432

Net investment gains (losses):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other-than-temporary impairments on fixed maturity securities
(1
)
 
(2
)
 
(1
)
 
(18
)
Other net investment gains (losses)
1

 
22

 
(54
)
 
(23
)
Total net investment gains (losses)

 
20

 
(55
)
 
(41
)
Net derivative gains (losses)
(78
)
 
(2,973
)
 
(1,043
)
 
(2,680
)
Total revenues
2,025

 
(584
)
 
2,990

 
1,805

Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Policyholder benefits and claims
785

 
1,153

 
1,649

 
1,890

Interest credited to policyholder account balances
284

 
291

 
559

 
581

Amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs and value of business acquired
21

 
(281
)
 
(127
)
 
(35
)
Other expenses
614

 
493

 
1,178

 
1,045

Total expenses
1,704

 
1,656

 
3,259

 
3,481

Income (loss) before provision for income tax
321

 
(2,240
)
 
(269
)
 
(1,676
)
Provision for income tax expense (benefit)
75

 
(817
)
 
(166
)
 
(660
)
Net income (loss)
$
246

 
$
(1,423
)
 
$
(103
)
 
$
(1,016
)
Comprehensive income (loss)
$
634

 
$
(1,247
)
 
$
526

 
$
93

Pro forma earnings per common share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
2.05


$
(11.88
)

$
(0.86
)

$
(8.48
)
See accompanying notes to the interim condensed combined financial statements.

3



Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Interim Condensed Combined Statements of Shareholder’s Net Investment and Noncontrolling Interests
For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 (Unaudited)
(In millions)
 
 
Shareholder’s Net Investment
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
 
Total Shareholder’s Net Investment
 
Noncontrolling Interests
 
Total
Shareholder’s Net Investment and Noncontrolling Interests
Balance at December 31, 2016
 
$
13,597

 
$
1,265

 
$
14,862

 
$

 
$
14,862

Change in net investment
 
1,027

 
 
 
1,027

 
 
 
1,027

Change in net investment of noncontrolling interests
 
 
 
 
 

 
50

 
50

Net income (loss)
 
(103
)
 
 
 
(103
)
 
 
 
(103
)
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of income tax
 
 
 
629

 
629

 
 
 
629

Balance at June 30, 2017
 
$
14,521

 
$
1,894

 
$
16,415

 
$
50

 
$
16,465

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Shareholder’s Net Investment
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
 
Total Shareholder’s Net Investment
 
Noncontrolling Interests
 
Total
Shareholder’s Net Investment and Noncontrolling Interests
Balance at December 31, 2015
 
$
15,316

 
$
1,523

 
$
16,839

 
$

 
$
16,839

Change in net investment
 
1,532

 
 
 
1,532

 
 
 
1,532

Net income (loss)
 
(1,016
)
 
 
 
(1,016
)
 
 
 
(1,016
)
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of income tax
 
 
 
1,109

 
1,109

 
 
 
1,109

Balance at June 30, 2016
 
$
15,832

 
$
2,632

 
$
18,464

 
$

 
$
18,464

See accompanying notes to the interim condensed combined financial statements.

4



Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Interim Condensed Combined Statements of Cash Flows
For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 (Unaudited)
(In millions)
 
Six Months
Ended
June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
$
1,325

 
$
2,134

Cash flows from investing activities
 
 
 
Sales, maturities and repayments of:
 
 
 
Fixed maturity securities
6,909

 
18,093

Equity securities
40

 
80

Mortgage loans
369

 
518

Real estate and real estate joint ventures
12

 
154

Other limited partnership interests
152

 
152

Purchases of:
 
 
 
Fixed maturity securities
(7,531
)
 
(21,328
)
Equity securities
(2
)
 
(56
)
Mortgage loans
(1,196
)
 
(1,035
)
Real estate and real estate joint ventures
(92
)
 
(35
)
Other limited partnership interests
(109
)
 
(89
)
Cash received in connection with freestanding derivatives
1,768

 
401

Cash paid in connection with freestanding derivatives
(2,721
)
 
(625
)
Receipts on loans to affiliates

 
50

Net change in policy loans
4

 
19

Net change in short-term investments
43

 
(808
)
Net change in other invested assets
(9
)
 
(4
)
Other, net
2

 

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
(2,361
)
 
(4,513
)
Cash flows from financing activities
 
 
 
Policyholder account balances:
 
 
 
Deposits
2,210

 
6,704

Withdrawals
(1,591
)
 
(7,917
)
Net change in payables for collateral under securities loaned and other transactions
(196
)
 
3,057

Long-term debt issued
2,988

 

Long-term debt repaid
(7
)
 
(13
)
Collateral financing arrangements repaid
(2,797
)
 

Financing element on certain derivative instruments and other derivative related transactions, net
46

 
(124
)
Cash received from MetLife in connection with shareholder's net investment
293

 
1,660

Cash paid to MetLife in connection with shareholder's net investment
(668
)
 
(37
)
Other, net
(27
)
 

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
251

 
3,330

Change in cash and cash equivalents
(785
)
 
951

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period
5,228

 
1,570

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period
$
4,443

 
$
2,521

Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information
 
 
 
Net cash paid (received) for:
 
 
 
Interest
$
89

 
$
100

Income tax
$
45

 
$
221

Non-cash transactions:
 
 
 
Transfer of fixed maturity securities from affiliates
$

 
$
3,478

Transfer of mortgage loans from affiliates
$

 
$
395

Transfer of short-term investments from affiliates
$

 
$
94

Transfer of fixed maturity securities to affiliates
$
293

 
$

Reduction of policyholder account balances in connection with reinsurance transactions
$
293

 
$

See accompanying notes to the interim condensed combined financial statements.

5

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited)

1. Business, Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Business
“Brighthouse” and the “Company” refer to Brighthouse Financial, Inc. and its subsidiaries (formerly, MetLife U.S. Retail Separation Business). Brighthouse Financial, Inc. is a holding company formed to own the legal entities that have historically operated a substantial portion of MetLife, Inc.’s former Retail segment. Brighthouse Financial, Inc. was incorporated in Delaware on August 1, 2016 in preparation for MetLife, Inc.’s then-planned separation of a substantial portion of its former Retail segment, as well as certain portions of its Corporate Benefit Funding segment (the “Separation”), which was completed on August 4, 2017.
The Company offers a range of individual annuities and individual life insurance products. The Company reports results through three segments: Annuities, Life and Run-off. In addition, the Company reports certain of its results in Corporate & Other.
On January 12, 2016, MetLife, Inc. (MetLife, Inc., together with its subsidiaries and affiliates, “MetLife”) announced its plan to pursue the separation of a substantial portion of its former U.S. retail business. Additionally, on July 21, 2016, MetLife, Inc. announced that the separated business would be rebranded as “Brighthouse Financial.”
On October 5, 2016, Brighthouse Financial, Inc., which until the completion of the Separation on August 4, 2017, was a wholly-owned subsidiary of MetLife, Inc., filed a registration statement on Form 10 (as amended, the “Form 10”) with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) that was declared effective by the SEC on July 6, 2017. The Form 10 disclosed MetLife, Inc.’s plans to undertake several actions, including an internal reorganization involving its U.S. retail business (the “Restructuring”) and include Brighthouse Life Insurance Company (“Brighthouse Insurance”), Brighthouse Life Insurance Company of NY (“Brighthouse NY”), New England Life Insurance Company (“NELICO”), Brighthouse Reinsurance Company of Delaware (“BRCD”) and Brighthouse Investment Advisers, LLC in the planned separated business and distribute at least 80.1% of the shares of Brighthouse Financial, Inc.’s common stock on a pro rata basis to the holders of MetLife, Inc. common stock. In connection with the Restructuring, effective April 2017, following receipt of applicable regulatory approvals, MetLife, Inc. contributed certain affiliated reinsurance companies and Brighthouse NY to Brighthouse Life Insurance Company. The affiliated reinsurance companies were then merged into BRCD, a licensed reinsurance subsidiary of Brighthouse Life Insurance Company. On July 28, 2017, MetLife, Inc. contributed Brighthouse Holdings, LLC to Brighthouse Financial, Inc. See Notes 10 and 13.
The accompanying interim condensed combined financial statements were prepared in connection with the Separation. The financial statements present the combined results of operations, financial condition, and cash flows of Brighthouse Financial, Inc. and its subsidiaries, as well as partnerships and joint ventures in which the Company has control, and variable interest entities (“VIEs”) for which the Company is the primary beneficiary. These financial statements were prepared on a combined basis because the operations were under common control. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated between the combined entities.
Basis of Presentation
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) requires management to adopt accounting policies and make estimates and assumptions that affect amounts reported on the interim condensed combined financial statements. In applying these policies and estimates, management makes subjective and complex judgments that frequently require assumptions about matters that are inherently uncertain. Many of these policies, estimates and related judgments are common in the insurance and financial services industries; others are specific to the Company’s business and operations. Actual results could differ from these estimates.
Combination
The combined balance sheets include the attribution of certain assets and liabilities that have historically been held at the MetLife corporate level but which are specifically identifiable or attributable to the Company. Similarly, certain assets attributable to shared services managed at the MetLife corporate level have been excluded from the combined balance sheets. The combined statements of operations reflect certain corporate expenses allocated to the Company by MetLife for certain corporate functions and for shared services provided by MetLife. These expenses have been allocated to the Company based on direct usage or benefit where specifically identifiable, with the remainder allocated based upon other reasonable allocation measures. The Company considers the expense methodology and results to be reasonable for all periods presented. See Note 12 for further information on expenses allocated by MetLife.

6

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
1. Business, Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued)

The Company has recorded affiliated transactions with certain MetLife subsidiaries which are not included in the combined financial statements of the Company.
The income tax amounts in these combined financial statements have been calculated based on a separate return methodology and presented as if each company was a separate taxpayer in its respective jurisdiction.
The historical financial results in the combined financial statements presented may not be indicative of the results that would have been achieved by the Company had it operated as a separate, stand-alone entity during the periods presented. The combined financial statements presented do not reflect any changes that may occur in the Company’s financing and operations in connection with or as a result of the Separation. Management believes that the combined financial statements include all adjustments necessary for a fair presentation of the business.
The accompanying interim condensed combined financial statements are unaudited and reflect all adjustments (including normal recurring adjustments) necessary to present fairly the financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the interim periods presented in conformity with GAAP. Interim results are not necessarily indicative of full year performance. The December 31, 2016 combined balance sheet data was derived from audited combined financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2016 included in the Form 10, which include all disclosures required by GAAP. Therefore, these interim condensed combined financial statements should be read in conjunction with the combined financial statements included in the Form 10.
Adoption of New Accounting Pronouncements
Effective January 1, 2017, the Company early adopted guidance relating to business combinations. The new guidance clarifies the definition of a business and requires that an entity apply certain criteria in order to determine when a set of assets and activities qualifies as a business. The adoption of this standard will result in fewer acquisitions qualifying as businesses and, accordingly, acquisition costs for those acquisitions that do not qualify as businesses will be capitalized rather than expensed. The adoption did not have an impact on the Company’s combined financial statements.
Effective January 1, 2017, the Company retrospectively adopted guidance relating to consolidation. The new guidance does not change the characteristics of a primary beneficiary under current GAAP. It changes how a reporting entity evaluates whether it is the primary beneficiary of a VIE by changing how a reporting entity that is a single decisionmaker of a VIE handles indirect interests in the entity held through related parties that are under common control with the reporting entity. The adoption of this new guidance did not have a material impact on the Company’s combined financial statements.
Effective January 1, 2017, the Company retrospectively adopted guidance relating to stock-based compensation. The new guidance changes several aspects of the accounting for share-based payment award transactions, including: (i) income tax consequences when awards vest or are settled; (ii) classification of awards as either equity or liabilities due to statutory tax withholding requirements; and (iii) classification on the statement of cash flows. The adoption of this new guidance did not have a material impact on the Company’s combined financial statements, except for expanded disclosures.
Other
Effective January 3, 2017, the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (“CME”) amended its rulebook, resulting in the characterization of variation margin transfers as settlement payments, as opposed to adjustments to collateral. These amendments impacted the accounting treatment of the Company’s centrally cleared derivatives, for which the CME serves as the central clearing party. At the effective date, the application of the amended rulebook, reduced gross derivative assets by $206 million, gross derivative liabilities by $927 million, accrued investment income by $30 million, collateral receivables recorded within premiums, reinsurance and other receivables of $765 million, and collateral payables recorded within payables for collateral under securities loaned and other transactions of $74 million.
Future Adoption of New Accounting Pronouncements
In May 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued new guidance on share-based payment awards (Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2017-09, Compensation — Stock Compensation (Topic 718) — Scope of Modification Accounting). The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017 and interim periods within those fiscal years. The new guidance should be applied prospectively to an award modified on or after the adoption date. Early adoption is permitted. The ASU includes guidance on determining which changes to the terms and conditions of share-based payment awards require an entity to apply modification accounting under Topic 718. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this guidance on its combined financial statements.

7

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
1. Business, Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued)

In March 2017, the FASB issued new guidance on purchased callable debt securities (ASU 2017-08, Receivables-Nonrefundable Fees and Other Costs (Subtopic 310-20), Premium Amortization on Purchased Callable Debt Securities). The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018 and interim periods within those years and should be applied on a modified retrospective basis through a cumulative-effect adjustment directly to retained earnings. Early adoption is permitted. The ASU shortens the amortization period for certain callable debt securities held at a premium and requires the premium to be amortized to the earliest call date. However, the new guidance does not require an accounting change for securities held at a discount whose discount continues to be amortized to maturity. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this guidance on its combined financial statements.
In March 2017, the FASB issued new guidance on the presentation of net periodic pension cost and net periodic postretirement benefit cost (ASU 2017- 07, Compensation — Retirement Benefits (Topic 715): Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost). The new guidance is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017 and interim periods within those annual periods. Early adoption is permitted at the beginning of an annual period for which financial statements (interim or annual) have not been issued or made available for issuance. The guidance requires that an employer that offers to its employees defined benefit pension or other postretirement benefit plans report the service cost component in the same line item or items as other compensation costs arising from services rendered by the pertinent employees during the period. The other components of net benefit cost are required to be presented in the income statement separately from the service cost component and outside a subtotal of income from operations, if one is presented. The guidance should be applied retrospectively for the presentation of the service cost component in the income statement and allows a practical expedient for the estimation basis for applying the retrospective presentation requirements. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this guidance on its combined financial statements.
In February 2017, the FASB issued new guidance on derecognition of nonfinancial assets (ASU 2017- 05, Other Income-Gains and Losses from the Derecognition of Nonfinancial Assets (Subtopic 610-20): Clarifying the Scope of Asset Derecognition Guidance and Accounting for Partial Sales of Nonfinancial Assets). The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017 and interim periods within those years. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016. The guidance may be applied retrospectively for all periods presented or retrospectively with a cumulative-effect adjustment at the date of adoption. The new guidance clarifies the scope and accounting of a financial asset that meets the definition of an “in-substance nonfinancial asset” and defines the term, “in-substance nonfinancial asset.” The ASU also adds guidance for partial sales of nonfinancial assets. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this guidance on its combined financial statements.
In November 2016, the FASB issued new guidance on restricted cash (ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): a consensus of the FASB Emerging Issues Task Force). The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017 and interim periods within those fiscal years, and should be applied on a retrospective basis. Early adoption is permitted. The new guidance requires that a statement of cash flows explain the change during the period in the total of cash, cash equivalents, and amounts generally described as restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents. As a result, the new guidance requires that amounts generally described as restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents should be included with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. The new guidance does not provide a definition of restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this guidance on its combined financial statements.
In October 2016, the FASB issued new guidance on tax accounting for intra-entity transfers of assets (ASU 2016-16, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory). The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017 and interim periods within those fiscal years, and should be applied on a modified retrospective basis. Early adoption is permitted in the first interim or annual reporting period. Current guidance prohibits the recognition of current and deferred income taxes for an intra-entity asset transfer until the asset has been sold to an outside party. The new guidance requires an entity to recognize the income tax consequences of an intra-entity transfer of an asset other than inventory when the transfer occurs. Also, the guidance eliminates the exception for an intra-entity transfer of an asset other than inventory. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this guidance on its combined financial statements.

8

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
1. Business, Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued)

In August 2016, the FASB issued new guidance on cash flow statement presentation (ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments). The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017 and interim periods within those fiscal years, and should be applied retrospectively to all periods presented. Early adoption is permitted in any interim or annual period. This ASU addresses diversity in how certain cash receipts and cash payments are presented and classified on the statement of cash flows. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this guidance on its combined financial statements.
In June 2016, the FASB issued new guidance on measurement of credit losses on financial instruments (ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments — Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments). The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2018. This ASU replaces the incurred loss impairment methodology with one that reflects expected credit losses. The measurement of expected credit losses should be based on historical loss information, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts. The new guidance requires that an other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) on a debt security will be recognized as an allowance going forward, such that improvements in expected future cash flows after an impairment will no longer be reflected as a prospective yield adjustment through net investment income, but rather a reversal of the previous impairment and recognized through realized investment gains and losses. The guidance also requires enhanced disclosures. The Company has assessed the asset classes impacted by the new guidance and is currently assessing the accounting and reporting system changes that will be required to comply with the new guidance. The Company believes that the most significant impact upon adoption will be to its mortgage loan investments. The Company is continuing to evaluate the overall impact of the new guidance on its combined financial statements.
In February 2016, the FASB issued new guidance on leasing transactions (ASU 2016-02, Leases — Topic 842). The new guidance is effective for the fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years, and requires a modified retrospective transition approach. Early adoption is permitted. The new guidance requires a lessee to recognize assets and liabilities for leases with lease terms of more than 12 months. Leases would be classified as finance or operating leases and both types of leases will be recognized on the balance sheet. Lessor accounting will remain largely unchanged from current guidance except for certain targeted changes. The new guidance will also require new qualitative and quantitative disclosures. The Company’s implementation efforts are primarily focused on the review of its existing lease contracts as well as identification of other contracts that may fall under the scope of the new guidance. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this guidance on its combined financial statements.
In January 2016, the FASB issued new guidance (ASU 2016-01, Financial Instruments — Overall: Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities) on the recognition and measurement of financial instruments. The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted for the instrument-specific credit risk provision. The new guidance changes the current accounting guidance related to (i) the classification and measurement of certain equity investments, (ii) the presentation of changes in the fair value of financial liabilities measured under the fair value option (“FVO”) that are due to instrument-specific credit risk, and (iii) certain disclosures associated with the fair value of financial instruments. Additionally, there will no longer be a requirement to assess equity securities for impairment since such securities will be measured at fair value through net income. The Company has assessed the population of financial instruments that are subject to the new guidance and has determined that the most significant impact will be the requirement to report changes in fair value in net income each reporting period for all equity securities currently classified as available-for-sale (“AFS”) and to a lesser extent, other limited partnership interests and real estate joint ventures that are currently accounted for under the cost method. The population of these investments accounted for under the cost method is not material. The Company is continuing to evaluate the overall impact of this guidance on its combined financial statements.






9

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
1. Business, Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued)

In May 2014, the FASB issued a comprehensive new revenue recognition standard (ASU 2014‑09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606)), effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017 and interim periods within those years. The guidance may be applied retrospectively for all periods presented or retrospectively with a cumulative-effect adjustment at the date of adoption. The new guidance will supersede nearly all existing revenue recognition guidance under U.S. GAAP; however, it will not impact the accounting for insurance and investment contracts within the scope of Financial Services insurance (Topic 944), leases, financial instruments and guarantees. For those contracts that are impacted, the guidance will require an entity to recognize revenue upon the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled, in exchange for those goods or services. Given the scope of the new revenue recognition guidance, the Company does not expect the adoption to have a material impact on its combined revenues or statements of operations, with the Company’s implementation efforts primarily focused on other revenues on the combined statements of operations.
2. Segment Information
The Company is organized into three segments: Annuities; Life; and Run-off. In addition, the Company reports certain of its results of operations in Corporate & Other. Also, in the fourth quarter of 2016, the Company moved the universal life policies with secondary guarantees (“ULSG”) business from the Life segment to the Run-off segment. These and certain other presentation changes were applied retrospectively and did not have an impact on total combined net income (loss) or operating earnings in the prior periods.
Annuities
The Annuities segment offers a variety of variable, fixed, index-linked and income annuities designed to address contractholders’ needs for protected wealth accumulation on a tax-deferred basis, wealth transfer and income security.
Life
The Life segment offers insurance products and services, including term, whole, universal and variable life products designed to address policyholders’ needs for financial security and protected wealth transfer, which may be provided on a tax-advantaged basis.
Run-off
The Run-off segment consists of products no longer actively sold and which are separately managed, including structured settlements, certain company-owned life insurance policies, bank-owned life insurance policies, funding agreements and ULSG.
Corporate & Other
Corporate & Other contains the excess capital not allocated to the segments and interest expense related to the majority of the Company’s outstanding debt, as well as expenses associated with certain legal proceedings and income tax audit issues. Corporate & Other also includes the elimination of intersegment amounts and term life insurance sold direct to consumers, which is no longer being offered for new sales.
Financial Measures and Segment Accounting Policies
Operating earnings is used by management to evaluate performance, allocate resources and facilitate comparisons to industry results. The Company believes the presentation of operating earnings, as the Company measures it for management purposes, enhances the understanding of its performance by highlighting the results of operations and the underlying profitability drivers of the business. Consistent with GAAP guidance for segment reporting, operating earnings is also the Company’s GAAP measure of segment performance and is reported below. Operating earnings should not be viewed as a substitute for net income (loss).

10

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
2. Segment Information (continued)

Operating earnings is a measure that focuses on the Company’s primary businesses principally by excluding the impact of market volatility, which could distort trends, and revenues and costs related to non-core products and businesses. Non-core businesses include discontinued operations and other businesses that have been or will be sold or exited by the Company, referred to as divested businesses and certain entities required to be consolidated under GAAP.
The following are excluded from total revenues in calculating operating earnings:
Net investment gains (losses);
Net derivative gains (losses) except: (i) earned income on derivatives and amortization of premium on derivatives that are hedges of investments or that are used to replicate certain investments, but do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment and (ii) earned income on derivatives that are hedges of policyholder account balances but do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment;
Amortization of unearned revenue related to net investment gains (losses) and net derivative gains (losses) and certain variable annuity guaranteed minimum income benefits (“GMIBs”) fees (“GMIB Fees”);
Certain amounts related to securitization entities that are VIEs consolidated under GAAP; and
Revenues from divested businesses.
The following are excluded from total expenses in calculating operating earnings:
Amounts associated with benefits and hedging costs related to GMIBs (“GMIB Costs”);
Amounts associated with periodic crediting rate adjustments based on the total return of a contractually referenced pool of assets and market value adjustments associated with surrenders or terminations of contracts (“Market Value Adjustments”);
Amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs (“DAC”) and value of business acquired (“VOBA”) related to: (i) net investment gains (losses) (ii) net derivative gains (losses), (iii) GMIB Fees and GMIB Costs and (iv) Market Value Adjustments;
Recognition of certain contingent assets and liabilities that could not be recognized at acquisition or adjusted for during the measurement period under GAAP business combination accounting guidance;
Expenses of divested businesses;
Amounts related to securitization entities that are VIEs consolidated under GAAP;
Goodwill impairment; and
Costs related to: (i) implementation of new insurance regulatory requirements and (ii) acquisition and integration costs.
The tax impact of the adjustments mentioned above are calculated net of the U.S. statutory tax rate, which could differ from the Company’s effective tax rate.
Set forth in the tables below is certain financial information with respect to the Company’s segments, as well as Corporate & Other, for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016. The segment accounting policies are the same as those used to prepare the Company’s combined financial statements, except for operating earnings adjustments as defined above. In addition, segment accounting policies include the method of capital allocation described below.
The internal capital model is a MetLife developed risk capital model that reflects management’s judgment and view of required capital to represent the measurement of the risk profile of the business, to meet the Company’s long term promises to clients, to service long-term obligations and to support the credit ratings of the Company. It accounts for the unique and specific nature of the risks inherent in the Company’s business. Management is responsible for the ongoing production and enhancement of the internal capital model and reviews its approach periodically to ensure that it remains consistent with emerging industry practice standards. As such, the internal capital allocation methodology in the future may differ from MetLife’s historical model.
The Company allocates equity to the segments based on the internal capital model and aligns with emerging standards and consistent risk principles.
Segment net investment income is credited or charged based on the level of allocated equity; however, changes in allocated equity do not impact the Company’s combined net investment income or net income (loss).

11

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
2. Segment Information (continued)

Net investment income is based upon the actual results of each segment’s specifically identifiable investment portfolios adjusted for allocated equity. Other costs are allocated to each of the segments based upon: (i) a review of the nature of such costs; (ii) time studies analyzing the amount of employee time incurred by each segment; and (iii) cost estimates included in the Company’s product pricing.

12

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
2. Segment Information (continued)

 
 
Operating Results
Three Months Ended June 30, 2017
 
Annuities
 
Life
 
Run-off
 
Corporate & Other
 
Total
 
 
(In millions)
Pre-tax operating earnings
 
$
313

 
$
23

 
$
79

 
$
11

 
$
426

Provision for income tax expense (benefit)
 
87

 
11

 
27

 
(23
)
 
102

Operating earnings
 
$
226

 
$
12

 
$
52

 
$
34

 
324

Adjustments for:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net investment gains (losses)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Net derivative gains (losses)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(78
)
Other adjustments to net income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(27
)
Provision for income tax (expense) benefit
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27

Net income (loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
246

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Inter-segment revenues
 
$
35

 
$
(99
)
 
$
52

 
$
(56
)
 
 
Interest revenue
 
$
311

 
$
69

 
$
354

 
$
58

 
 
Interest expense
 
$

 
$

 
$
8

 
$
28

 
 
 
 
Operating Results
Three Months Ended June 30, 2016
 
Annuities
 
Life
 
Run-off
 
Corporate & Other
 
Total
 
 
(In millions)
Pre-tax operating earnings
 
$
501

 
$
39

 
$
(476
)
 
$
5

 
$
69

Provision for income tax expense (benefit)
 
143

 
5

 
(160
)
 
2

 
(10
)
Operating earnings
 
$
358

 
$
34

 
$
(316
)
 
$
3

 
79

Adjustments for:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net investment gains (losses)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20

Net derivative gains (losses)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(2,973
)
Other adjustments to net income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
644

Provision for income tax (expense) benefit
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
807

Net income (loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
(1,423
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Inter-segment revenues
 
$
319

 
$
(178
)
 
$
1

 
$
2

 
 
Interest revenue
 
$
367

 
$
102

 
$
353

 
$
47

 
 
Interest expense
 
$

 
$

 
$
15

 
$
28

 
 

13

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
2. Segment Information (continued)

 
 
Operating Results
Six Months Ended June 30, 2017
 
Annuities
 
Life
 
Run-off
 
Corporate & Other
 
Total
 
 
(In millions)
Pre-tax operating earnings
 
$
623

 
$
8

 
$
153

 
$
34

 
$
818

Provision for income tax expense (benefit)
 
169

 
3

 
52

 
(10
)
 
214

Operating earnings
 
$
454

 
$
5

 
$
101

 
$
44

 
604

Adjustments for:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net investment gains (losses)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(55
)
Net derivative gains (losses)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1,043
)
Other adjustments to net income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11

Provision for income tax (expense) benefit
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
380

Net income (loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
(103
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Inter-segment revenues
 
$
60

 
$
(240
)
 
$
49

 
$
(70
)
 
 
Interest revenue
 
$
638

 
$
176

 
$
712

 
$
124

 
 
Interest expense
 
$

 
$

 
$
23

 
$
58

 
 
 
 
Operating Results
Six Months Ended June 30, 2016
 
Annuities
 
Life
 
Run-off
 
Corporate & Other
 
Total
 
 
(In millions)
Pre-tax operating earnings
 
$
841

 
$
26

 
$
(326
)
 
$
(12
)
 
$
529

Provision for income tax expense (benefit)
 
228

 
2

 
(111
)
 
(9
)
 
110

Operating earnings
 
$
613

 
$
24

 
$
(215
)
 
$
(3
)
 
419

Adjustments for:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net investment gains (losses)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(41
)
Net derivative gains (losses)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(2,680
)
Other adjustments to net income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
516

Provision for income tax (expense) benefit
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
770

Net income (loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
(1,016
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Inter-segment revenues
 
$
382

 
$
(336
)
 
$
2

 
$
37

 
 
Interest revenue
 
$
705

 
$
195

 
$
698

 
$
84

 
 
Interest expense
 
$

 
$

 
$
30

 
$
55

 
 

The following table presents total revenues with respect to the Company’s segments, as well as Corporate & Other:
 
 
Three Months
Ended
June 30,
 
Six Months
Ended
June 30,
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
 
 
(In millions)
Annuities
 
$
1,126

 
$
1,457

 
$
2,200

 
$
2,676

Life
 
305

 
312

 
595

 
610

Run-off
 
545

 
512

 
1,084

 
1,046

Corporate & Other
 
82

 
76

 
171

 
174

Adjustments
 
(33
)
 
(2,941
)
 
(1,060
)
 
(2,701
)
Total
 
$
2,025

 
$
(584
)
 
$
2,990

 
$
1,805



14

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
2. Segment Information (continued)

The following table presents total assets with respect to the Company’s segments, as well as Corporate & Other, at:

June 30, 2017

December 31, 2016

(In millions)
Annuities
$
151,709

 
$
152,146

Life
15,705

 
17,150

Run-off
41,261

 
40,007

Corporate & Other
15,653

 
12,627

Total
$
224,328


$
221,930

3. Insurance
Guarantees
As discussed in Notes 1 and 4 of the Notes to the Combined Financial Statements included in the Form 10, the Company issues variable annuity products with guaranteed minimum benefits. Guaranteed minimum accumulation benefits (“GMABs”), the non-life contingent portion of guaranteed minimum withdrawal benefits (“GMWBs”) and the portion of certain GMIBs that do not require annuitization are accounted for as embedded derivatives in policyholder account balances and are further discussed in Note 5.
The Company also issues universal and variable life contracts where the Company contractually guarantees to the contractholder a secondary guarantee.
Information regarding the Company’s guarantee exposure was as follows at:
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
 
 
In the
Event of Death
 
At
Annuitization
 
In the
Event of Death
 
At
Annuitization
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
Annuity Contracts (1), (2)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variable Annuity Guarantees
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total account value (3)
$
114,981

 
$
65,899

 
$
111,719

 
$
64,503

 
Separate account value
$
109,827

 
$
64,505

 
$
106,759

 
$
63,025

 
Net amount at risk
$
5,862

(4)
$
2,893

(5)
$
6,837

(4)
$
3,313

(5)
Average attained age of contractholders
68 years

 
67 years

 
67 years

 
67 years

 
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
 
Secondary Guarantees
 
(Dollars in millions)
Universal and Variable Life Contracts
 
 
 
Total account value (3)
$
9,453

 
$
9,326

Net amount at risk (6)
$
101,677

 
$
102,635

Average attained age of policyholders
60 years

 
59 years

__________________
(1)
The Company’s annuity contracts with guarantees may offer more than one type of guarantee in each contract. Therefore, the amounts listed above may not be mutually exclusive.
(2)
Includes direct business, but excludes offsets from hedging or reinsurance, if any. Therefore, the net amount at risk presented reflects the economic exposures of living and death benefit guarantees associated with variable annuities, but not necessarily their impact on the Company. See Note 6 of the Notes to the Combined Financial Statements included in the Form 10 for a discussion of certain living and death benefit guarantees which have been reinsured.
(3)
Includes the contractholder’s investments in the general account and separate account, if applicable.

15

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
3. Insurance (continued)

(4)
Defined as the death benefit less the total account value, as of the balance sheet date. It represents the amount of the claim that the Company would incur if death claims were filed on all contracts on the balance sheet date and includes any additional contractual claims associated with riders purchased to assist with covering income taxes payable upon death.
(5)
Defined as the amount (if any) that would be required to be added to the total account value to purchase a lifetime income stream, based on current annuity rates, equal to the minimum amount provided under the guaranteed benefit. This amount represents the Company’s potential economic exposure to such guarantees in the event all contractholders were to annuitize on the balance sheet date, even though the contracts contain terms that allow annuitization of the guaranteed amount only after the 10th anniversary of the contract, which not all contractholders have achieved.
(6)
Defined as the guarantee amount less the account value, as of the balance sheet date. It represents the amount of the claim that the Company would incur if death claims were filed on all contracts on the balance sheet date.
Liabilities for Unpaid Claims and Claim Expenses
Rollforward of Claims and Claim Adjustment Expenses
Information regarding the liabilities for unpaid claims and claim adjustment expenses was as follows:
 
Six Months
Ended
June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
 
(In millions)
Balance at December 31 of prior period
$
2,008

 
$
1,719

Less: Reinsurance recoverables
1,832

 
1,565

Net balance at December 31 of prior period
176

 
154

Cumulative adjustment (1)

 
89

Net balance, beginning of period
176

 
243

Incurred related to:
 
 
 
Current period
400

 
516

Prior periods (2)
(13
)
 
(27
)
Total incurred
387

 
489

Paid related to:
 
 
 
Current period
(312
)
 
(343
)
Prior periods
(55
)
 
(122
)
Total paid
(367
)
 
(465
)
Net balance, end of period
196

 
267

Add: Reinsurance recoverables
1,845

 
1,659

Balance, end of period
$
2,041

 
$
1,926

______________
(1)
Reflects the accumulated adjustment, net of reinsurance, upon implementation of the new short-duration contracts guidance which clarified the requirement to include claim information for long-duration contracts. The accumulated adjustment primarily reflects unpaid claim liabilities, net of reinsurance, for long-duration contracts as of the beginning of the period presented.
(2)
During the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the claims and claim adjustment expenses associated with prior years changed due to differences between the actual benefits paid and the expected benefits owed during those periods.

16

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)

4. Investments
Fixed Maturity and Equity Securities Available-for-Sale
Fixed Maturity and Equity Securities Available-for-Sale by Sector
The following table presents the fixed maturity and equity securities AFS by sector. Redeemable preferred stock is reported within U.S. corporate and foreign corporate fixed maturity securities and non-redeemable preferred stock is reported within equity securities. Included within fixed maturity securities are structured securities including residential mortgage-backed securities (“RMBS”), commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) and asset-backed securities (“ABS”) (collectively, “Structured Securities”).
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
 
Cost or
Amortized
Cost
 
Gross Unrealized
 
Estimated
Fair
Value
 
Cost or
Amortized
Cost
 
Gross Unrealized
 
Estimated
Fair
Value
 
Gains
 
Temporary
Losses
 
OTTI
Losses (1)
 
Gains
 
Temporary
Losses
 
OTTI
Losses (1)
 
 
(In millions)
Fixed maturity securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. corporate
$
20,837

 
$
1,700

 
$
125

 
$

 
$
22,412

 
$
21,278

 
$
1,324

 
$
291

 
$

 
$
22,311

U.S. government and agency
13,959

 
1,673

 
121

 

 
15,511

 
12,032

 
1,294

 
236

 

 
13,090

RMBS
7,973

 
264

 
74

 
(5
)
 
8,168

 
7,961

 
206

 
144

 

 
8,023

Foreign corporate
6,395

 
334

 
102

 

 
6,627

 
6,343

 
230

 
180

 

 
6,393

State and political subdivision
3,573


483


13




4,043


3,590


393


38




3,945

CMBS
3,247

 
67

 
16

 
(1
)
 
3,299

 
3,799

 
44

 
32

 
(1
)
 
3,812

ABS
2,223

 
19

 
4

 

 
2,238

 
2,654

 
12

 
14

 

 
2,652

Foreign government
1,070

 
143

 
4

 

 
1,209

 
1,058

 
116

 
12

 

 
1,162

Total fixed maturity securities
$
59,277


$
4,683


$
459


$
(6
)

$
63,507


$
58,715


$
3,619


$
947


$
(1
)

$
61,388

Equity securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-redeemable preferred stock
$
147

 
$
11

 
$
2

 
$

 
$
156

 
$
180

 
$
6

 
$
9

 
$

 
$
177

Common stock
100

 
22

 

 

 
122

 
100

 
23

 

 

 
123

Total equity securities
$
247


$
33


$
2


$


$
278


$
280


$
29


$
9


$


$
300

__________________
(1)
Noncredit OTTI losses included in accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) in an unrealized gain position are due to increases in estimated fair value subsequent to initial recognition of noncredit losses on such securities. See also “— Net Unrealized Investment Gains (Losses).”
The Company held non-income producing fixed maturity securities with an estimated fair value of less than $1 million and $5 million with unrealized gains (losses) of less than ($1) million and less than $1 million at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively.
Maturities of Fixed Maturity Securities
The amortized cost and estimated fair value of fixed maturity securities, by contractual maturity date, were as follows at June 30, 2017:
 
Due in One
Year or Less
 
Due After One
Year Through
Five Years
 
Due After Five
Years
Through Ten Years
 
Due After Ten
Years
 
Structured
Securities
 
Total Fixed
Maturity
Securities
 
(In millions)
Amortized cost
$
1,770

 
$
11,680

 
$
9,720

 
$
22,664

 
$
13,443

 
$
59,277

Estimated fair value
$
1,780

 
$
12,110

 
$
10,019

 
$
25,893

 
$
13,705

 
$
63,507

Actual maturities may differ from contractual maturities due to the exercise of call or prepayment options. Fixed maturity securities not due at a single maturity date have been presented in the year of final contractual maturity. Structured Securities are shown separately, as they are not due at a single maturity.

17

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
4. Investments (continued)

Continuous Gross Unrealized Losses for Fixed Maturity and Equity Securities AFS by Sector
The following table presents the estimated fair value and gross unrealized losses of fixed maturity and equity securities AFS in an unrealized loss position, aggregated by sector and by length of time that the securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position at:
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
 
Less than 12 Months
 
Equal to or Greater
than 12 Months
 
Less than 12 Months
 
Equal to or Greater
than 12 Months
 
Estimated
Fair
Value
 
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
 
Estimated
Fair
Value
 
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
 
Estimated
Fair
Value
 
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
 
Estimated
Fair
Value
 
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
 
(Dollars in millions)
Fixed maturity securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. corporate
$
2,842

 
$
82

 
$
529

 
$
43

 
$
4,676

 
$
189

 
$
745

 
$
102

U.S. government and agency
5,763

 
121

 

 

 
4,396

 
236

 

 

RMBS
2,853

 
53

 
522

 
16

 
3,494

 
112

 
818

 
32

Foreign corporate
643

 
21

 
634

 
81

 
1,466

 
66

 
633

 
114

State and political subdivision
403

 
11

 
29

 
2

 
889

 
35

 
29

 
3

CMBS
620

 
12

 
102

 
3

 
1,572

 
27

 
171

 
4

ABS
244

 
2

 
195

 
2

 
478

 
6

 
461

 
8

Foreign government
178

 
3

 
7

 
1

 
273

 
11

 
6

 
1

Total fixed maturity securities
$
13,546


$
305


$
2,018


$
148


$
17,244


$
682


$
2,863


$
264

Equity securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-redeemable preferred stock
$
7

 
$

 
$
22

 
$
2

 
$
57

 
$
2

 
$
40

 
$
7

Total equity securities
$
7


$


$
22


$
2


$
57


$
2


$
40


$
7

Total number of securities in an unrealized loss position
1,165

 
 
 
365

 
 
 
1,741

 
 
 
483

 
 
Evaluation of AFS Securities for OTTI and Evaluating Temporarily Impaired AFS Securities
As described more fully in Notes 1 and 7 of the Notes to the Combined Financial Statements included in the Form 10, the Company performs a regular evaluation of all investment classes for impairment, including fixed maturity securities, equity securities and perpetual hybrid securities, in accordance with its impairment policy, in order to evaluate whether such investments are other-than-temporarily impaired.
Current Period Evaluation
Based on the Company’s current evaluation of its AFS securities in an unrealized loss position in accordance with its impairment policy, and the Company’s current intentions and assessments (as applicable to the type of security) about holding, selling and any requirements to sell these securities, the Company concluded that these securities were not other-than-temporarily impaired at June 30, 2017. Future OTTI will depend primarily on economic fundamentals, issuer performance (including changes in the present value of future cash flows expected to be collected), changes in credit ratings, collateral valuation, interest rates and credit spreads, as well as a change in the Company’s intention to hold or sell a security that is in an unrealized loss position. If economic fundamentals deteriorate or if there are adverse changes in the above factors, OTTI may be incurred in upcoming periods.
Gross unrealized losses on fixed maturity securities decreased $493 million during the six months ended June 30, 2017 to $453 million. The decrease in gross unrealized losses for the six months ended June 30, 2017 was primarily attributable to narrowing credit spreads and decreasing longer-term interest rates.
At June 30, 2017, $5 million of the total $453 million of gross unrealized losses were from nine fixed maturity securities with an unrealized loss position of 20% or more of amortized cost for six months or greater.
The change in gross unrealized losses on equity securities was not significant during the six months ended June 30, 2017.

18

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
4. Investments (continued)

Investment Grade Fixed Maturity Securities
Of the $5 million of gross unrealized losses on fixed maturity securities with an unrealized loss of 20% or more of amortized cost for six months or greater, $4 million, or 80%, were related to gross unrealized losses on three investment grade fixed maturity securities. Unrealized losses on investment grade fixed maturity securities are principally related to widening credit spreads since purchase and, with respect to fixed-rate fixed maturity securities, rising interest rates since purchase.
Below Investment Grade Fixed Maturity Securities
Of the $5 million of gross unrealized losses on fixed maturity securities with an unrealized loss of 20% or more of amortized cost for six months or greater, $1 million, or 20%, were related to gross unrealized losses on six below investment grade fixed maturity securities. Unrealized losses on below investment grade fixed maturity securities are principally related to U.S. and foreign corporate securities (primarily industrial securities) and are the result of significantly wider credit spreads resulting from higher risk premiums since purchase, largely due to economic and market uncertainties including concerns over lower oil prices in the energy sector. Management evaluates U.S. and foreign corporate securities based on factors such as expected cash flows and the financial condition and near-term and long-term prospects of the issuers.
Mortgage Loans
Mortgage Loans by Portfolio Segment
Mortgage loans are summarized as follows at:
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
 
Carrying
Value
 
% of
Total
 
Carrying
Value
 
% of
Total
 
(Dollars in millions)
Mortgage loans:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commercial
$
6,959

 
67.8
 %
 
$
6,523

 
69.6
 %
Agricultural
2,116

 
20.6

 
1,892

 
20.2

Residential
1,109

 
10.8

 
867

 
9.2

Subtotal (1)
10,184

 
99.2

 
9,282

 
99.0

Valuation allowances
(44
)
 
(0.4
)
 
(40
)
 
(0.4
)
Subtotal mortgage loans, net
10,140

 
98.8

 
9,242

 
98.6

Commercial mortgage loans held by CSEs — FVO
123

 
1.2

 
136

 
1.4

Total mortgage loans, net
$
10,263

 
100.0
 %
 
$
9,378

 
100.0
 %
__________________
(1)
Purchases of mortgage loans were $147 million and $307 million for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, and were primarily comprised of residential mortgage loans. Purchases of mortgage loans were $192 million and $231 million for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2016, respectively, and were primarily comprised of residential mortgage loans.
See “— Variable Interest Entities” for discussion of consolidated securitization entities (“CSEs”).
Information on commercial, agricultural and residential mortgage loans is presented in the tables below. Information on commercial mortgage loans held by CSEs — FVO is presented in Note 6. The Company elects the FVO for certain commercial mortgage loans and related long-term debt that are managed on a total return basis.

19

Table of Contents
Brighthouse Financial, Inc.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Combined Financial Statements (Unaudited) — (continued)
4. Investments (continued)

Mortgage Loans, Valuation Allowance and Impaired Loans by Portfolio Segment
Mortgage loans by portfolio segment, by method of evaluation of credit loss, impaired mortgage loans including those modified in a troubled debt restructuring, and the related valuation allowances, were as follows at:
 
Evaluated Individually for Credit Losses
 
Evaluated Collectively for
Credit Losses
 
Impaired Loans
 
Impaired Loans with a
Valuation Allowance
 
Impaired Loans without a
Valuation Allowance
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Unpaid Principal Balance
 
Recorded Investment
 
Valuation
Allowances
 
Unpaid Principal Balance
 
Recorded
Investment
 
Recorded
Investment
 
Valuation
Allowances
 
Carrying
Value
 
(In millions)
June 30, 2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commercial
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
6,959

 
$
34

 
$

Agricultural
4

 
3

 

 

 

 
2,113

 
6

 
3

Residential

 

 

 
3

 
3

 
1,106

 
4

 
3

Total
$
4


$
3


$


$
3


$
3


$
10,178


$
44


$
6

December 31, 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commercial
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
6,523

 
$
32

 
$